Thursday, 31 May 2012

York Minster - Work In Progress

Work continues on The Monster  Minster. Here is an update, it's on the drawing board so it was hard to photograph. I left a pencil to let you feel the size: its circa 16" x 16 " (40 cms x 40 cms).

I guess it's half finished, and presenting quite a challenge - thank goodness.

When it was being built, they realised the roof was too big to be spanned by stone and they would have to use oak. They had to delay until they had gathered the timber ...but then... the Master Builder developed a fear of heights and the delay went on for years. I have a certain amount of sympathy with him :0)

                                                           Click on Images to Enlarge



42 comments:

  1. It took ages to build this, I read a historic novel years ago about a stonemason who worked on churches all over Europe, very interesting. Most of his work was so high up that hardly anybody could see it. Your drawing is fantastic, John, I can't even imagine the challenge. Great to see your progress!

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    1. It's a very interesting building indeed, Judy. I will give some interesting facts about it later. Thank you for your kind remarks

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  2. A great work that is coming upon the GREAT! Thank you John, for sharing your dedication to the drawing!I admire you,John !

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    1. Thank you, Rita I'm quite enjoying the challenge.

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  3. monster minster ...looks like you are progressing quickly john with the drawing ....looks very challenging

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    1. It has gone very well really, Jane ... I just wish my work liked to be shown on the screen

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  4. Wonderful touch with the values John. I know it can be tedious, but steady is the only way to go with this complicated a drawing. I'd be getting out of my chair or taking a turn around the block every half hour. You're doing great. It's fantastic (that has become such a trite word with all the kids using it today, but this is fantastic in every original sense of the word). --Now I know where you've been and why you've been so tongue tied. LOL You're chained to your drafting board.

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    1. Sorry to have been so self-centred :0) I'll be back lowering the tone of your neighbourhood soon.

      Thank you for yopur words of encouragement - much appreciated.

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  5. Gadzooks this is an amazing drawing! I am so glad you took this on....it is coming out magnificently and it is a testament to how draftsmanship will always win out over cameras and computers when it comes to expressive "heart". The intricacy and the accuracy of this is awesome and your positive emotions for the place shine through. I'll be watching for the next phase...thanks for the update! WOW!

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    1. You're too kind, Celeste ... Romantic truth versus Photographic Realism :0))

      The building is so beautiful it almost draws itself.

      Thanks for your encouragement, it really helps.

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  6. John your eye for detail amazes me. May I be so bold to ask if you use a ruler for lines at all or are you able to do this all free hand? Just beautiful either way. WOW!!!!

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    1. It depends on the subject really, Lynn. With the smooth lines of a cathedral I use a straight edge for the shading and 'skyline' lines, because if they are wrong it insults the building.

      In this building I use the straight edge about 40% of the time but on the "Monk Bar" for example, most of the work is freehand.

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    2. It is simply marvelous however you make it happen!

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  7. You must have incredible patience and perseverance! Your detail is amazing. I love the interesting facts you share too!

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    1. Most people say that, Minn, but I'm not know as a patient man.

      I like to know about the subjects I draw, I feel more in touch with them that way, and it's always fun to share.

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  8. Well the intricate strokes here are quite remarkable! It'll be so worth it when it's done - it looks fantastic!!

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    1. I just added a row of trees ... wonderful to unbend for an hour or two on them.

      Thanks for the encouragement, Sandra

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  9. What an unbelievably intricate work of architecture. And your very detailed drawing is doing the "monster" great justice.

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    1. It's quite difficult to marry the details to the angles, but I'm getting there.

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  10. I am awestruck and dumbstruck! Wow, wow, wow is all that will come out of my mouth (keyboard)!

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    1. (Chuckle) I'm quite enjoying it, it's a real tester ;0)

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  11. Loving this drawing. It has a difficult perspective and those really awesome and even more difficult lines and details. Waiting for it to finish now.

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  12. You got it in one, Prabal. The perspective encourages one to draw the right angles but at the same time they feel wrong. It's like flying on instruments which you know are right, but feel wrong.

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  13. John, I write this with my mouth wide open. Oh my, Oh my, you are an amazing artist. Yes, like Susan, I also am awestruck, Great work John.

    All the best to you,
    Joan

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    1. You really are too kind, Joan - thank you.

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  14. John, I'm speechless. This is an amazing drawing and I can't thank you enough for letting us look over your shoulder. Brilliant work. ;-)

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    1. John, my dear chap, how kind you are - thank you.

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  15. Oh my gosh, John....an AWESOME drawing so far...I don't blame the master builder..I would have had the same fear of heights!!! God has given you such talented hands!!! again, an amazing drawing!!!!

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    1. Thank you, Hilda. I confess as I grow older my head for heights worse. A long way from parachuting, when I was 24!

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  16. I love to draw and paint but I would never have the patience for this kind of wonderful detail. I am in awe every time I come here. Love all the info you give out about your subjects too. Hope your wife got those bedding plants planted. :) I agree about not calling Nurseries..Garden Centers. Nursery is a more picturesque name. :)

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  17. Glad yo enjoyed it, Cris - Pat will plant the rest when/if it ever stops raining :0)

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  18. What a amazing sketch, so full of details and just perfect !

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  19. Thanks Jane, glad you liked it

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  20. Ciao John, I think is a monster...of beatiful! It is difficult to think and imagine what kind of work there is under this construnction! Today is not the same of many and many years ago!
    Oh yea!
    Ciao, ciao, Floriana

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  21. Ciao Floriana ... Beauty & the Beast :0) It's the second biggest Cathedral in Britain. I love drawing it though, it's the only to see it properly.

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  22. John this is absolutely magnificent! And I mean that from the bottom of my heart. I can't even wrap my head around how you do this, it take such skill, mastery really, like I've said before, but also there's so much feeling in it too. That's what I love about your drawings, they aren't simply fabulously well done architectural drawings, they are a story too, a life. I love that so much. :) Do you make prints of these? I'd love to have one.

    And I hope it's all right to say this here, but I just wanted you to know how much I appreciate your kind comments and friendship since I've met you. You brighten my day when I see your name in my inbox, thank you John. :))

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  23. I'm really flattered that you like the drawing, Crystal. I do like to know the background to the object I'm drawing and if that shows then I'm very happy.

    The drawing is almost finished, but I'm off for a few days with my granddaughter, for her 21st birthday, so it will have to wait until next weekend.

    I will be getting prints made but it will be a few weeks yet. I'll let you know.

    Thank you for your generous comments.

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  24. Hello John, magnificent work, brilliant!!.
    Bye!!
    Eugenio.

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  25. Hello John, magnificent work, brilliant!!.
    Bye!!
    Eugenio.

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  26. Brilliant! What a talented steady hand you have - and it's easy to see your heart is involved also! The drawing is amazing and the history of the "monster" fascinating. Thanks so much for sharing! Did you really parachute?! Wow! You have seen the landscape from a perspective most of us can't imagine! Hope you are having a lovely time with your granddaughter!

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    1. Thank you, Rosemary - I'm glad you enjoyed the history of the building. Yes I had to do my 'jumps' I hated every moment and wouldn't have done if I hadn't had to :0))
      ...50 years ago now!

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